Pictures of the Year 2013

“Cameras in the hands of photographers with hearts can capture love – hope – passion – change lives and make the world a better place. And all it takes is 1/500th of a second.” -Eddie Adams

2013 CMTS SQ50 Joseph Chick-1

I struggle with my year’s best work. I tend to see my most recent work as my best. I tend to become a little bored of the work which I’ve spent too much time considering or editing. I tend not to see my photos the way others do because I see everything, not just the highlights. I will be working on my 2013 box set over the next week or two; my ten best of the year, as I see them. It’s been a pretty good year, and there should be lots to choose from, but it also feels a little like wading into murky water.

In the meantime I have collected links to Photos of the Year galleries. Photography is getting richer, and while it’s easy to find post after post predicting the long slow decline of both professional photography and photography as most people understand it, I don’t see it the same way. I am optimistic. I believe we are in a Renaissance period in which technology is fueling creativity and broadening the way we share images. There are more ways to make a photo than ever before and there are more ways to share photography than ever before. And while change has come and will continue to impact the traditional channels through which photography has been shared, the value of quality work is getting higher. It does, however, require adaptation. While Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer made a statement early this year equating professional photography with the storage capacity one might need, the difference between professional photography and that of even the most advanced amateurs in not merely defined by the equipment or software we use. It is no more the camera that makes the photographer than it is a hammer that makes a carpenter, or a note pad that makes a reporter. Beyond risk and opportunity it is the cumulative total of experience, judgement and skill that makes any photo as much as it is the camera and this year’s best photos are a perfect illustration of this truth.

BBC:

Year in Pictures

Time Magazine:

LightBox The Year In Pictures (Multiple Galleries)

LightBox The Year in 365 Pictures

The Atlantic In Focus – The Year In Photos:

Part 1: 2013 The Year In Photos January-April

Part 2: 2013 The Year In Photos May-August

Part 3: 2013 The Year In Photos September-December

Reuters Full Focus:

Best Photos of the Year

The New York Times:

2013 The Year in Pictures

National Geographic:

2013 Year In Review

Sportsnet:

PINKBIKE’S Photos of the Year

Sports Illustrated:

Pictures of the Year

Billboard Magazine:

Photos of the Year: Best Instagrams of 2013  OMG!

Happy New Year everyone.

Recent Work – Coast Mountain Trail Series: Buckin’ Hell.

It is impossible to overstate how challenging fog, rain and darkness can be to capturing a solid trail running photo. Cold hands and wet feet conspire with less than watertight outerwear to make waiting for the next runner to appear on trail truly an endeavour. Yesterday morning on Mount Seymour, on Vancouver’s North Shore runners were hammered by aforementioned rain and fog while I stood waiting and wondering if this is the shoot that exceeds the weather proofing of my camera gear.

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I did my best, and though the response has been supper positive as photos have hit the social media feeds, I scroll through the images in lightroom and see more examples of where I can improve than not.

Evey shoot is an opportunity to learn something, how to better prepare, to try new techniques to deal with challenging shooting environments and to think of new uses for zip lock freezer bags. Which I was wishing for as my speed light took a drenching even under the thick canopy of trees. I will stash a few in my still damp camera bag when I am hone again in about ten days.

I’m at an airport this morning, thousands of kilometres away from where my day started yesterday on Mt Seymour’s Old Buck trail for the Coast Mountain Trail Series event Buckin’ Hell and I am trying, for the first time, to publish a post from my phone. Fingers Crossed.

A huge thanks to Gary Robbins and Geoff Langford for inviting me along on their inaugural CMTS season as race photographer, to the scores of volunteers who make events like this possible and to our runners who make challenge look easy and inspire the rest of us.

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Personal Work – From the Portrait Project with Gary & Elaine

Gary Robbins Profile WM-43

Lots going on over the last month; but work is like dinner, it’s better to be looking at it than for it. It has been an interesting several weeks of photography including a snowshoe race, shooting trail running, road running and some personal work, a Ms Teen pageant and on going work on a cookbook project for a local restaurant client. I’ve also had the chance to hear and hang out with Photographer Ian Ruhter who has been in Vancouver for a number of local speaking engagements and wet plate demos, if you aren’t familiar with Ian’s work, have a look at the first video he and his crew produced about a year ago: Silver & Light.

Two weeks ago I ventured into the trails above North Vancouver with Ultra Trail Runner Gary Robbins to work on some profile pictures which would serve double purpose for both my personal portrait work and Gary’s need for some new Profile content. Gary took us to a great little trail hub that provided an opportunity for a variety of looks and we finished with a couple of head shot style portraits fitting for a trail runner and event manager. In looking back at this work and the photos that will follow of both Gary and Elaine, I see characters in their environments. These are studies of people in the places they are most comfortable.

Gary Robbins Profile Web WM-13

By now the room that surrounds Elaine at her Piano will be very different. I haven’t seen it yet, but I understand that the shelves are nearly clear of books, packed and bound for new shelves in a new space in a new home. With lees than a month on the clock before Elaine and her husband Ken move into their new home I felt it was important to make a photo of Elaine at her piano in the house she has lived in for close to 30 years. I believe the spaces we inhabit, whether we choose them or they are chosen for us, become a part of who we are. I can’t wait to see Elaine’s new space, but I am glad we were able to get one last look at the old one.

Elaine Carty Portrait Project 2013-15

One more look:

Elaine Carty Portrait Project 2013-9

My space is subject to a perpetual cycle of cluttering and uncluttering. It is never static and often feels like a bit of a disaster. My workspace is often surrounded by piles of paper, folders, files and business cards and equipment transiting from one bag to another between shoots and assignments. One day I will make a self portrait of this chaos when I am brave enough to share, honestly, the state of my desk.